Consume These Foods to Lower Your Cholesterol Level

If you want to stay healthy, you need to pay attention to the foods that you consume. Foods contain many things that are useful for your body such as vitamins, minerals, and protein. On the other hand, foods also contain fat as well that might be not so good for your health. Basically, fats can be categorized into two main types, saturated fats and non saturated fats. Non saturated fats are good for your health. However, saturated fats are bad for your health and you need to avoid foods that contain high amount of saturated fats. If you consume saturated fats, the level of cholesterol in your blood will increase. High level cholesterol will lead to serious health issues such as heart disease and high blood pressure.

If you want to lower your cholesterol level, there are several types of food that you can consume so that you can lower the cholesterol level in your blood effectively. The first type of food that you should consume to lower your cholesterol level is oatmeal. Oatmeal is a great source of fiber. Fiber can improve your digestive system and help your body to lower the cholesterol level. Besides oatmeal, other type of food that you can consume to lower cholesterol level is garlic. If you consume garlic regularly, you might be able to lower your cholesterol level in more effective way.

Vegetables and fruits that contain high amount of antioxidant also can help you to lower cholesterol level in your blood as well. You can consume fruits and vegetables such as cabbage, paprika, broccoli, mango, apricot, spinach, carrot, berries, and guava. Other great fruit that can help you to lower cholesterol level is avocado. Consuming low fat milk and low fat cheese might also help you in lowering your cholesterol level as well. You also can lower your cholesterol level by consuming herbal supplement. You can visit Ahlikolesterol.com to find more information about this herbal supplement that can help you to lower your cholesterol level in easier way.

A New Old Idea, on Real Natural Health

Natural health is not an alternative health care system. It has been around for thousands of years. Modern medicine has been around for about 100 years. God is the creator of all, there is no question that man cannot improve on the original creation, although man thinks he can. If man thinks he can improve on it, then we really have an inferior God, and I think not. What does real natural health mean? The creation model is all that was here before man and has not been altered by man. We really could call that organic. Getting real health is not about eating grass and drinking weird beverages. That can be all good for you, but it likely will not repair any real root issues.

That means all of modern mankind has been trying to do something with health care, but have been chasing symptoms and not finding root issues. Man has made medicine that chases that symptom and creates more side effects than the symptom they were after. Something is seriously wrong with this concept.

After years of looking at this and studying God’s Word and His creation in nature, I am finally convinced of all of the foregoing as an absolute. I get asked all of the time, can you prove all of this? If you mean prove it by man’s standard and science, then I would say no, because that is the wrong standard. If you mean can I prove it in nature, I will say absolutely yes. All of nature is screaming it. If you just look at a leaf off of a tree as an example, it is a really interesting creation.

Leaves do not just fall off a tree randomly. There is a creative process they go through. They have cells in them that are called “abscission” cells. They have the same root as the word scissors, meaning they are designed or created, like scissors, to make a cut; Cutting the leaf a little at a time until it falls off or gets blown off because it has been cut at the stem. The tree has to get rid of excess baggage and become dormant for the winter. There are a number of other reasons they come off I will not take the time to go into. But when a leaf comes off of the tree, it goes to the ground in a forest of trees to start the rotting process to become fertilizer for the ground to enrich the soil to grow more and stronger roots and bark and more, all has a purpose. All of this process has a purpose in God’s Kingdom. This is also a way that God lets us know about things or events of our life, good and bad. All will fall to the ground to become rich soil to keep us growing and ultimately become what God created us to be.

If you really study this whole process from a creation perspective and not an evolutional process, you will start to see a creative design. It is the only true conclusion that can come from this type of study. There are always those who will argue with the tree and all of creation. Arguing with a tree or any creation is not very smart from my perspective and experience.

Man was created in a similar way, with a very exact process of operation. Every cell in the human body has a function that has to do with life on earth. The human body has only one goal, that is to stay alive and do what it was created for. With that in mind, the body always handles the acute issue first that threatens the life of the body. As an example It will always try to deal with bleeding first so the body can live.
In extreme cold weather, it will slow the blood flow down in all of the extremities in an attempt to keep the core of the body functioning or alive even losing the limbs in the process.

The point of all of this is attempting to repair the human body by disassociating the heart from the rest of the body will never be good for the life of the body. In other words, you can do nothing with the heart without considering the rest of the body. There are cells that communicate with each other from head to toe in order to keep the highest priorities in order. You cannot treat an organ by itself. I know the science world will argue with all of this from their standard of care. The body is in perfect balance and order when it is put back to how God created it and this is very doable.

Change the paradigm to how the creation works and it opens many doors and starts to make perfect sense because all of creation makes sense. Man making chemical drugs and attempting to force the body to do what it was not created for never will make sense. This system only makes a lot of money for a lot of people. The main issue is you cannot patent anything in natural creation so manmade chemicals are sometimes put together saying it all came from natural ingredients and it in the real sense has not.

It’s Your Health – Take Care

Conventional Medicine treats the parts of us that are ailing. This is done mainly with pharmaceutical treatments. This comes from a view of our body as separate parts and not as a whole being.

Prescription drugs are used to repair our defective parts with little or no concern for the possible harmful effects on some of our otherwise healthy parts.

We all see the ads for these products on TV. The voiceover announcer spends 10 seconds touting the healing benefits of a drug and 50 seconds, auctioneer style, warning about the side effects.

Many great medical discoveries over the years are allowing many people to live today with illnesses that would otherwise be fatal. But western medicine’s focus is on the symptoms, and to a lesser extent, the cure. Not the prevention.

When symptoms are controlled the treatment is considered to be successful. The symptoms are managed but the cause of the illness has not been addressed.

Conventional medicine is fixated on numbers. A disease or illness is identified by its symptoms and doctors look at the numbers, high blood pressure, diabetes etc., and prescribe treatment based on the numbers. The disease or illness remains until the cause is treated.

“Symptoms control” buys you time to find and treat the cause of your disease or illness. Too many of us do not go beyond the prescription for drug treatment of the symptoms. We are happy with the temporary relief and the fact that we can pop a pill whenever the symptoms appear again.

We do have excellent western medicine practitioners, but very few write prescriptions for proper nutrition and exercise. This is all our body needs in most cases to treat the cause of many of our common diseases and illnesses.

Healthy food is the best medicine. Yes, it is that simple. Researchers on healthy lifestyles all over world come to the same conclusion. A whole foods, plant-based diet together with regular exercise will help us to live long and healthy lives.

Our doctors can help with the treatment of symptoms but we have the control over the cure. Our body has the ability to cure itself if given the right foods and exercise.

No doctor can cure a disease or illness. Your doctor can diagnose your diabetes but you have to take control and change your diet and start exercising if you really want to be cured.

Unfortunately too many of us believe that we can be reckless with our health because we have a great medical system and highly knowledgeable, skilled doctors to take care of us.

5 Easy Tips to Improve Sleep Quality

Getting quality sleep can be a rather difficult issue for many of us. As a result, we may end up groggy and slow the next day, and sometimes we don’t even know why.

Bad patterns can vary from not being able to fall asleep, through waking up in every five minutes, to sleep too “awake”. Occasionally, there might be situations that stress you out, like an exam, or a presentation at work, but it is always better to face these challenges with a fully functioning brain.

Being groggy and having cloudy cognitive abilities are not the only effect that sleep deprivation causes. It impairs attention and alertness that improves the risk of accidents. It affects concentration and consolidating memories – which means that you won’t be able to remember what your learnt the previous day, which isn’t ideal for students. It can also result in depression and anxiety, which even boosts by the fact, that the lack of sleep ages your skin. There are serious long-term consequences as well, such as heart disease, obesity and diabetes.

So, how to sleep better? There isn’t one good way to help you, as we all are different. But certainly, there are good ways to help your brain switch off easier. Here are 5 tips that will surely result in better sleep hygiene.

Develop your rituals

When we were children, our parents led us through the same bedtime rituals every night: put us in the bath, read for us, and tucked us in. These rituals will help us, adults, as well. Find the most relaxing evening routines for yourself, drink a hot decaf tea, have a goodnight bath, or do light yoga. Try to avoid caffeine, alcohol, and intense sports activities.

Regular sleep and wake schedule.

Going to bed more or less the same time every day helps to set your internal clock. This way, even if sometimes you have to stay up later, or wake up earlier, getting back to the same schedule will be easier, and you can keep this pattern for a long period.

No clock gazing

You won’t benefit from staring at the clock and realize every five minutes that you are not asleep yet. You can develop a bad habit of always counting how much time you have left until the morning. It will keep your stressed out constantly. Put the bright blinking clock a bit further away from your bed, and try to not think about the time, and focus on relaxing.

Create proper sleep environment

A male clinic study found that the best environment for a good night sleep is a dark, quiet and a bit cool room. It’s worth investing in blinds, earplugs, and a good air conditioning. The better you feel physically, the better you slumber.

Get rid of electric devices

In our modern life, we probably have all kinds of gadget that keep us awake if left in the bedroom. There isn’t any need for a TV, a computer, or your smartphone in there. Quit checking your smartphone before bedtime, the news feed won’t help you falling asleep.

These 5 tips will help you establish a better environment for quality sleep. Just remember to start your rituals on time, around the same time every day, don’t stress our about the blinking lights of the clock, create your little undisturbed room that is free from any kind of electric devices, and have a long, quality and relaxing rest.

General Consumer Medicine Information

Imovane is a drug specially prescribed for persons who are suffering from insomnia. However, some take this drug as an antidepressant. Zopiclone is sedating and as such it is used as a sleeping pill. It works by causing a tranquilization of the central nervous system of the human body.

This article will answer some general questions about Imovane. It does not include all the available information and therefore it is not practical to replace your doctor or pharmacist. Since all medicines have risks and benefits, your doctor will weigh the risks of prescribing Imovane against the benefits it will have to you.

What is Imovane used for?

Imovane can be used by people who have trouble sleeping. This disorder is known as insomnia. Imovane can help you fall asleep and reduces the number of times you will wake up during the night. It is used for short term treatment of insomnia, such as 2 – 4 weeks. However, your doctor might prescribe Imovane for other purposes. Ensure to ask your doctor about the uses of Imovane if it is prescribed to you.

When not to take Imovane

Do not take Imovane if you have:
• been drinking alcohol or there is alcohol in your bloodstream
• sleep apnea
• myasthenia gravis
• severe liver problems
• acute and/or severe lung problems
• had a stroke

Moreover, it is recommended that you do not take Imovane if you are allergic to it or any of the ingredients in contains, such as; calcium hydrogen phosphate, starch-wheat, sodium starch glycollate, lactose, magnesium stearate, hypromellose, titanium dioxide, and macrogol 6000.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction include skin rash, itching, shortness of breath, swelling of the face, lips or tongue, which may cause difficulty swallowing or breathing. Also, do not take Imovane if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, after the expiration date printed on the pack or if the packaging is damaged or has been tampered with.

How to Take Imovane

Imovane should only be taken when you are able to get a full night’s sleep of 7 to 8 hours, before you need to be active again. The standard adult dose of Imovane is one tablet just before bed. If you are over 65 years of age, the dosage would be a half of a tablet taken before bed.

Ask your doctor about the uses Imovane if you are unsure of the correct dose you should take. He will tell you exactly how much to take, as taking the wrong dose may not work. Also, Imovane should be not be given to children or adolescents less than 18 years of age.

Lastly, Imovane tablets must be swallowed with a full glass of water.

When to Take Imovane

Take Imovane immediately before bed. It helps to put you to sleep quite quickly. Note however, if you take Imovane on an empty stomach, it might work quicker.

Side Effects of Imovane

All medicines have some unwanted side effects. Sometimes they are serious, but sometimes they are not. You need not be alarmed, as you may not experience any of them. The list of possible side effects includes headaches, dry mouth, a bitter taste in your mouth, drowsiness, heartburn, nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea, change in appetite, stomach pain, rash etc. Consult with your doctor about the effects before using Imovane.

Storing Imovane

Keep your tablets in the blister pack until it is time to take them. If you remove the tablets from the box or blister pack, they may not keep well. Other information about Imovane storage is also printed in the package itself.

Home Health Care Has Many Facets

The concept of home health care has grown dramatically in the last several years. As the dynamics of the modern family have shifted (smaller extended families, homes where all the adults are working, etc.), many of the functions a relative would have performed in the past are being outsourced to organizations that can meet these needs. Being able to provide quality services in the comfortable and familiar setting of the patient’s residence has become part of the mission statement of these mobile medical providers.

There are a several types of individual scenarios that can benefit from having access to a professional caregiver who visits the patient (or patients) in their own living space. Listed below is a sampling of those individuals who may use this vital service:

Mothers and Newborns

Being able to provide education and assessment to new mothers and their babies just home from the hospital fulfills a vital role that may have been traditionally performed by a family member. Having a trained medical practitioner on hand can get both mother and child started on the right path.

Post-Operative Patients

Often, individuals who have had major surgery require follow-up attention, even after being discharged. Transportation may also be an issue; particularly if the patient is not able to move on their own. Having these evaluations performed at the residence is both convenient and more comfortable for the person who is recovering.

Older Americans

Taking care of the elderly who are dealing with medical issues but want to maintain the independence of living on their own is one of the traditional roles of home health care providers. These regular visits help these senior members maintain a good quality of life while having the knowledge that their medical needs will be met.

Mentally Disabled Adults

The need to provide medical and emotional support for these individuals to remain a part of the community is an important function of these traveling caregivers.

Younger Adults

For younger individuals who are recovering from an injury or accidents, and otherwise can manage their own affairs, having the knowledge that a medical professional is on hand adds a layer of comfort as they regain their active lifestyle.

Patients with Chronic Conditions

Diseases like diabetes, kidney disease, Alzheimer’s, and heart failure require constant monitoring. Many of those dealing with these chronic issues still want to live on their own and may not require the constant attention of an assisted living facility. Regular visits help these patients maintain their independence without having to sacrifice the medical oversight that they need.

Home health care will continue to evolve as the population changes. With the number of older Americans increasing and outpatient care on the upswing, the need for this personalized access will only expand and will include all ages and situations.

When Is It Time to Consider Home Health Care?

While home health care is a common practice, many people aren’t aware of the benefits it offers. With this service, patients forgo hospitalization, and instead receive all the attention they need in the comfort of their own home. Although it is often associated with a substitute for nursing homes, in-house service can be a great fit for patients of any age, whether they need routine care or help recovering from an injury. So, how do you know when it’s time to consider in-house medical attention for yourself or your loved ones?

When the Comfort of Home is Important to Recovery

Most people would agree that staying in their own homes is preferable to a night’s stay at the hospital. Staying in a hospital may cause certain individuals a great deal of anxiety; for these people, home health care is a very helpful alternative. The person receiving the care can ease their stress level, putting them in an ideal mindset for achieving a quick recovery.

When it Reduces Unnecessary Time and Travel

Among other things, in-house service can be ideal for patients needing assistance with health-related tasks that need to be performed daily or weekly. For example, a great number of people who receive home health care receive assistance with administering daily or weekly shots. This would mean traveling to the hospital or a physician countless times, making this the less time-consuming and more convenient option.

When Travel is Impossible

For some, traveling may simply be a matter of convenience or preference. However, one of the most common reasons to seek out this service is to receive daily or weekly physical therapy that speeds recovery after an injury. It’s not uncommon for injuries, such as a broken arm or a leg, may render the patient incapable of safely or comfortably driving. In this case, home health care is not simply a matter of convenience; it is a matter of necessity. Arranging for this type of service will take the stress out of trying to find other travel accommodations, speeding up the healing process considerably.

When it Offers an Alternative to a Nursing Home

One of the most common uses for home health care is to offer elderly loved ones an alternative to a nursing home. In-house care may be preferable for a variety of reasons: there may not be a nursing home in your area, making visits rare or impossible, or your loved one may feel uncomfortable with the idea of relocating their entire life at their age. It may offer peace of mind to your loved ones and your family, as they can continue to live in their homes while receiving all of the medical attention they would in a nursing home.

Modern Health Care in the Age of the Internet and Social Medicine

Are we are all “medical citizens,” embedded as potential or actual patients, with our physicians, insurer’s, pharmaceutical companies, government bodies and others in a system of societal, moral and organizational stakeholders?

Today, with the advent of the Internet, High Speed Bandwidth, Social Media, Support Groups and Self Care Protocols, patients for the first time in the history of medicine have the ability to alter the outcome of disease and illness for themselves, family members, friends and significant others.

This essay attempts to address a most compelling issue of our time. Are medical self-help groups and self-care methods helpful or are they challenges to the delivery of traditional medical care? How do they differ and what consequences arise from this debate?

Also, how has the advent of the Internet and Social media transformed the landscape of medicine? What limitations may exist in this new era of information technology and social communication? And to what degree do they challenge traditional care models? Can a patient or their advocate become more of an expert on their own medical conditions than their own physicians? The answer to this question is a resounding yes, if the patient uses all the tools now available to them.

Various published estimates unanimously indicate that hundreds of thousands of patients die and millions more are injured by medical procedures gone wrong, medication errors or their side effects and by medications improperly prescribed or not taken as directed by patients. And it is not just the infirm that suffer, but their families, their loved one’s, friends and employer’s who must suffer with the grief and change of lifestyle that so often comes with these mistakes.

Furthermore, on May 8, 2013 National Center for Policy Analysis, in a release, stated that first diagnosis error rates are increasing at an alarming rate:

• An estimated 10 percent to 20 percent of cases are misdiagnosed, which exceeds drug errors, and surgery on the wrong patient or body part, both of which receive considerably more attention.

• One report found that 28 percent of 583 diagnostic mistakes were life threatening or had resulted in death or permanent disability.

• Another study estimated that fatal diagnostic errors in United States intensive care units equal the number of breast cancer deaths each year — 40,500.

Therefore, second opinions are often necessary precautions, as are third opinions when the first two differ. In fact, Medicare and insurers often pay for third opinions under these circumstances as it saves them billions in the long run.

Prudence dictates that the “medical citizen” must beware of these pitfalls, as their lives may depend on it.

Also, with patient reviews and rating systems available right on our own smartphones, we must question whether or not physician decision making is being compromised as well. For instance, a surgeon knows that his or her treatment decisions can possibly either result in either saving a life or ending it resulting in damning social media judgements, whether legitimate or not, which can then hurt their medical practices? Does this introduce a bias that may alter or cloud a doctor’s judgement? There is no data to provide an answer as of yet.

So, are doctors becoming more risk adverse as a result of this new landscape? Physicians are now being compensated more and more based on better outcomes, lower costs, reduced re-admission rates and other variables – not staff friendliness or less waiting room times which many doctor review sites measure.

Often 5 star rating systems get few patient reviews despite the fact that the average doctor has some 2,000 patient charts (most healthy) and while it is human nature to complain when we don’t get the outcome we want, consumers are less likely to praise a positive experience because we naturally expect top service and thus neglect to post a positive patient review yet are rather far more likely to post a negative review to retaliate against the provider. So patient reviews are not a very good or objective source of fair and balanced overall rating of a doctor’s performance.

How can this dilemma be resolved especially when a surgeon does everything perfectly but the patient becomes a victim of medication errors, poor nursing compliance with medical orders or perhaps contracts a hospital born infection, or some other adverse event out of the doctor’s control even if the doctor’s work is excellent? Nevertheless these doctor review sites often blame the physician. So Patients need better tools to make judgements about their own healthcare whether it be which plan to select or which treatment option to go with given a choice.

If a patient does utilize a rating site, they should make sure it is a government site based on huge amounts of data or a private site wherein doctors nominate other doctors for their excellence and would use these “doctor’s doctors” to provide care for their very own friends and loved ones.

Doctor reviews by other sites using stupid criteria like waiting room times, friendliness of staff, waiting room decor and other questions that have nothing to do with best outcomes accomplish nothing but make money for their operators.

In modern day, it is not unusual for patients to challenge doctors when it comes to illness and disease. After all, according to Tejal Gandhi, MD, president of the National Patient Safety Foundation and associate professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School, “Preventable medical errors persist as the No. 3 killer in the U.S. – third only to heart disease and cancer – claiming the lives of some 400,000 people each year, at a cost of over a trillion dollars a year””.

Self-help groups and self-care probably date back to the dawn of civilization when people lived cooperatively in tribal settings. These groups dealt with all life issues related to the survival and political stability of the group. The dawn of medical ethics probably dates back some 2300 years with the publication of the Hippocratic Oath.

But now the game has dramatically changed due to major technological advances in medicine and with the great advances of the Internet now being the primary source of medical information for medical consumers. And with the explosion in social media, people have the ability to communicate and share information on a scale never before foreseen or imagined.

Add to this all the new stakeholders that have entered the fray such as insurance companies, employers, managed care organizations, Obamacare, biotech companies, governments and, of course, pharmaceutical companies and healthcare policy makers. The challenges faced by the medical citizen and social policy planners have never been so daunting.

Postmodern Medicine probably arose after the institution of Medicare in 1965 when Medicare was signed into law in 1965 by President Lyndon Johnson and third party payer insurance companies soon appeared thereafter. By the 1970’s the practice of medicine became the business of medicine and third party payment systems caused a surge in demand for services and the costs of healthcare delivery soared. Also, the debate over what is a disease and what is an illness now must be addressed in a sociological manner more than ever as it affects whether treatments are made available and what costs are covered by third party payers.

Self Help Groups are usually a group or set of people who all share or suffer from a similar malady which involves great personal cost and suffering for themselves and those who care for them.

Self-care is seemingly clear in meaning. We get a cut and we put a band aid on it. Have a headache, take an aspirin. But is it really so clear as pharmacy shelves that are now filled will medications that used to be available only by prescription and medical devices one can use for self-diagnosis and self-care which measure bodily functions and vital signs such as blood sugar levels, blood pressure, pulse oxygenation, etc. have resulted in patients self diagnosing and treating themselves, often without medical advice. Defibrillators are now a fixture in most large organizations where non-medical designated company personnel are trained and authorized to shock a worker’s heart in addition to CPR.

Supplies such as instant blood clotting powder, specialized bandages, diabetic compression socks that were not previously available in pharmacies, are now commonplace. But many of these products may do as much harm as good, if not used properly.

Self-care at least in many of its versions, usually includes some connection with the health care system, teaching people when they need a professional, how to do a self-examination and care for a condition without medical supervision. e.g. Changing wound dressings and bandages without the presence of a home care aid.

And with the advent of new and off-label use of FDA approved medications, televisions are awash with commercials advertising new drugs and therapies which espouse incredible benefits such as Viagra, which resulted in a stampede of male patients running to their doctors demanding buckets of the stuff, making Viagra one of the most profitable elective medications ever.

Television ads by pharmaceutical companies now target the consumer directly in order to create demand for their products, which can only be prescribed by a physician, are commonplace as well. Also, in fine print and muffled high speed speech, pharmaceutical companies attempt in these ads to disclaim liability for the fact that the medications advertised directly to consumers may have side effects that could seriously mess a person up or even cause death, while at the same time they are trying to get consumers to ask their doctors for these medications. This is a radical change in the supply chain and distribution of new pharmaceutical products and protocols.

So, what is a medical citizen to do? Turn to the Internet of course for information and Social Media discourse. The Internet is after all now the primary source of health and medical information as well as social communication.

Today, with over a hundred million American’s online with their computers, tablets, cellphones, and smart watches along with highly specialized apps, finding support is like reading a menu in a Greek diner. If can be hard to choose wisely.

The problem in discerning useful and credible information from garbage in, garbage out, or from commercial sites looking to sell goods and services targeting specific users based upon searches performed by the user and transmitted to advertisers via cookies and Flash Player LSOs.

Most people probably do OK and, undoubtedly, are using this resource responsibly. These resources can improve and maybe extend patient’s lives and allow them to find communities of other’s suffering from the same malady as them and can assist health care outcomes and help contain health care costs to society. We are now entering the world of virtualization, telemedicine, doctor and hospital rating websites and long distance robotic surgery as well as even fields like quantum medicine which seems like it comes right out of a sci-fi novel.

Where this will lead us in the future remains to be seen and cannot definitively be addressed in this essay.

This also leaves us with the issue of contested illness. As opposed to a disease, like a clogged artery that must be repaired with a stent in a catheterization laboratory by an interventional cardiologist, or an infection that must be treated with antibiotics by a physician, many illnesses are unexplained by traditional medicine, as opposed to diseases which are clearly recognized by healthcare providers. Illnesses are often easily dismissed by formal medicine resulting in denial of treatment or refusal of insurers to pay.

But the collective description of the same array of similar symptoms occurring among many thousands of individuals communicating with each other using self-help groups can lead to a change of heart in the medical establishment. Not to mention diseases that carry a social stigma with them where the patient is blamed for their own symptoms, like obesity, even though there are in fact diseases that cause obesity or depression, addiction and a host of illnesses that have not as yet been classified as diseases and for which there is no biomedical solution.

Online support groups can and have brought these conditions to the forefront, as in the case of fibromyalgia which is now recognized as a treatable disease, but for a long time was a contested illness dismissed by professionals as people too lazy to work or just seeking pain medication. What is certain is that online support groups provide people with opportunities to exchange information with each other and become experts on their medical problems.

Internet self-help groups are cost free and very effective. People helping people. It is a simple concept, especially in the age where the nuclear family is nearly extinct in western society, so people now seek out extended families. But self-help groups which are self contained and autonomous in theory are still predisposed to traditional group problems such as rivalry within the groups, inappropriate members, etc. They are also targets of commercial interests, for example when a user who does not know how to surf anonymously gets hundreds of cookies on the device they are using and then they start to receive unwanted ads by commercial interests or worse, spam and theft of private information.

Self-Help groups offer other benefits such as “Improved coping with Chronic Illness and Life Transitions, Friendship and Belonging, Spiritual Renewal, Increased Political Activism, Enhancing Civil Society and Reduced Healthcare Resource Use” (Humphreys, Keith, Social Policy, Spring 97, Vol 27 Issue 3 Pages 2-5)

That said, “social movements that consider themselves omnipotent and omniscient are often dangerous”. (Humphreys, Keith, Social Policy, Spring 97, Vol 27 Issue 3 Page 5)

You can bring a horse to water but you cannot make it drink. Many people are too set in their ways, too judgmental and have ulterior motives which can corrupt or disrupt the best intentions of the many.

Many medical professionals feel that patients playing doctor carries potentially serious risks as patients are not doctors or trained medical professionals. On the other hand, many would argue the same about professionals and professional groups which previously enjoyed unquestioned stature and in many instances took offense to being questioned or challenged.

But for a patient with a complex disease possibly accompanied by other co-morbid conditions, The Internet affords them unlimited access to research the latest medical treatments, pharmaceuticals and lot of other research that their internist may not be aware of.

With heavy patient loads a physician does not have the time to spend researching all of the worlds medical literature on new FDA approved medications and procedures. After a doctor sees a patient, often they don’t give that person’s situation another thought as they have 30 more patients to see that day plus hospital rounds.

But for the sick, if they have reasonably good intelligence and most likely they have much more time on their hands to research their specific disease or diseases that have devastated their quality or life, ability to work or career advancement, relationships all of which suffer, it is a logical assumption that with enough time and perseverance, the patient can find better treatment modalities or better doctors that can relieve most of their symptoms or possibly cure them completely.

If a patient remains docile, asks no questions, fails to review complex bills which even medical auditors cannot understand the billing codes used, then the patient will likely not receive the best possible outcome.

This issue has been thoroughly researched by the Institute of Medicine and the data resoundingly shows that informed patients consistently have better medical outcomes than patients that suffer in silence. The data is irrefutable!

So common sense dictates that patients should be proactive and learn as much as they can about their diseases or illnesses and work collaboratively with their doctors as a team, the goal being better medical care. Often physicians resist this in which case, a change of doctor may be in the best interest of the patient.

For example, mortality related to cardiac catheterization and angiography are significant enough that patients should be informed of the risks of death or major complications from the procedure or that there is an alternative called computed tomography angiography which can replace conventional coronary angiography in appropriate patients and is half the cost of the traditional procedure which is very lucrative for interventional cardiologists whereas computed tomography angiography is not. It is also a non-invasive procedure which will benefit those eligible at much less risk and a lower cost as well.

I am now speaking from personal experience because my own father, who died on Jan 26, 2006, suffered from complications that arose after a cardiac catheterization and angiography procedure that was unnecessary. A year prior to my father’s passing he had a stent placed in his left descending coronary artery which went flawlessly. Because my father was retired and living in NY he would visit all of his doctors prior to making his annual trip to Florida where he spent the winters in the sun.

This procedure was elective because his cardiologist suggested that the stent be checked before the trip. I should have known better and stopped him, since I was a patient and medical consumer advocate and researched and published reports for consumers and researched diseases for medical professionals for a living. The name of my company at the time was “Health Reports” a service of Multimedia Solutions Inc. a NY company I founded but due to later disability had to stop.

I accompanied my father on all of his doctor visits and when he went to the hospital he for this ambulatory procedure he was fine and he drove his own car to the hospital anticipating go home the same day.

His Interventional Cardiologist that did the procedure afterward said the stent was in beautiful condition but something went wrong because after the procedure my fathers extremities started turning blue from cyanosis. The doctor of course denied any relationship between the two events that happened within hours of each other.

The only possible conclusion that I could draw was that the catheter wire chipped of a piece of calcified plaque and lodged most likely in his lung as an embolism as he developed severe respiratory distress immediately after the angiogram. Now that had to be the greatest coincidence ever or a terrible medical mistake.

So a routine preventive screening where I was going to drive my dad home the same day turned into a week in the hospital after which he was moved into a step down rehabilitation facility and was expected to recover and go home.

On the evening before he was supposed to go home to continue his recovery at home, I visited him with my daughter and immediately saw something was very wrong.

Since there was only one doctor on the floor for about 50 adult residents, I practically had to physically drag the doctor to his room where his only suggestion was that he go back to the hospital. It took the ambulance 30 minutes to arrive to take hime to a major trauma hospital that was literally only a couple of hundred yards from where he was. I could have wheeled him over to the ER faster.

He died around 2 a.m. the next morning. They said he died from mesothelioma. I knew that was impossible because I never even heard the man cough once in his life or present with any of the symptoms of mesothelioma and I was in business with him for many years as well as his son.

Then, recently, when I was hospitalized in a Florida hospital for severe low potassium which was easily resolved over a few days of IV potassium infusion, a cardiologist walked into my room and said he wanted to do an angiogram just before my discharge, to check my stent that I had done a year earlier and I knew was fine and it literally became an argument because I questioned his authority. He finally admitted that the risk of death or complication during a cardiac cateterization were not insignificant. I finally agreed to a non-invasive Cardiac Ultrasound which showed absolutely nothing wrong.

And it had no relationship to why I was even in the hospital. I was released later that day and when I saw my regular cardiologist in New York, he called the other doctor a name I would rather not repeat and told me I may have saved my own life by contesting this man who I never saw before or since.

The odd thing is I only know this because I am an experienced Medical Literature Researcher but disabled.

Because too often patients are not informed of other treatment options for what ever ails them or for that matter the risks associated with many procedure options, because their doctors are simply unaware or don’t care or want to make the most money. Today, hiring an expert medical literature researcher is not a bad idea. And even a personal Patient Advocate which is a growing field for which no professional certification is required is a good idea if you can afford it because if your flat on your back and not in control and perhaps don’t even have family to help you, a personal Patient Advocate can be a good idea.

This is the new reality of healthcare. Its hard to be a practicing physician these days because of the rate of innovation, the problems of being a businessman, dealing with regulatory bodies, covering your hospitalized patients, litigation, etc. Many doctor’s can’t deal with it and quit medicine. And its getting harder.

Common sense also dictates that there is no longer a monopoly on medical information in this new era of instant information and mass communication and that transparency like revolution is a good thing once in a while.

In conclusion, as this essay attempts to address whether or not medical self help groups and self care alternatives are positive adjuncts or harmful challenges to medical care and how they contrast with one another as well as what consequences arise from such analysis, we can conclude with certainty that since the advent of the polio vaccine which brought about a tidal wave of medical advances available to help physicians cure disease, we are now in a new and ever evolving era of unprecedented advances in medicine, information and transparent social communication.

The costs of medical research and care have as a result of these advances skyrocketed to the point that medical resources have to be used in a more cost effective manner. Also, the issue of rationing medical care is one that social policy makers must give great weight to in their deliberations going forward since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

The issues are so complicated that consumers have a very difficult time making decisions as to how to best care for themselves and their families. Just picking a health plan can be a nightmare for families and professionals as different plans at different prices can work towards a families’ benefit or detriment depending on their socio-economic status, health history and lifestyles.

If these developments aren’t enough to contend with, the current power of the Internet as a source of both information and now also a powerful social medium in which people can connect with one another on a mass scale must be viewed as a benefit in a system that needs checks and balances due to the entry of so many stakeholders some of whom do not have the patient’s best interests at heart but instead are motivated by greed or are simply incompetent in their professions.

Self help groups, self care and the ability of a patient, or a loved one or an advocate to be involved in the management of illness and disease must work dynamically and cooperatively with their physicians, within this new medical landscape because the genie is now out of the bottle and we can’t look back but must look forward to a system of patients and caregivers working as a team towards the goal of healing and improving the quality of life of our citizens.

So what does the future hold. The last 30 years have seen an evolutionary leap more like one would likely see in a century or more. Now with new technologies such as 3-d copying and printing, and computer aided manufacturing and new medical fields like quantum medicine which uses the principles of quantum physics to better understand biology the future possibilities are mind boggling. The Civil war was only 152 years ago. Since then mankind has progressed from a way of life that sustained civilization for some 200,000 years at an astronomical rate. Can we absorb so much change so fast?

How Electronic Medical Record Systems Have Changed The Way Patient Information Is Stored

Technology has come quite a long way from where it was many years ago. It might seem unbelievable to the generation of today to think that 40 years ago, hospitals did not have computer systems in place to keep track of patient records and instead wrote everything down and stored information via filing cabinets. Some institutions used typewriters, but this method was still very time consuming.

The development of EMR systems has forever changed how patient information is stored and maintained. This type of technology allows for faster record keeping and also lets medical staff access records quicker and cuts down on patient wait times.

Every medical institution, such as hospitals, clinics, and private offices require a reliable system. As aforementioned, stocking and categorizing of documents that had been either handwritten or typed used to be the most common way of storing medical records. This method would create piles upon piles of papers being stored in large rolling filing cabinets.

The burden placed upon the medical team under these circumstances was immense because they had to search for medical files on a daily basis. Once the file folder was found, they then had to sift through all of the paperwork within the file in order to find the document needed. The medical staff was also responsible for maintaining the integrity of the files and keeping them safe from harm.

When records were kept in their physical forms, the risk of these sensitive files falling into the wrong hands was high. Sometimes medical documents became lost, stolen, or damaged in natural disasters without any backup measures having been put into place.

EMR systems changed all of this almost instantly. Paperless, computerized record keeping systems have redesigned the entire process of medical record keeping. All patient records are stored in the medical system via computer. These records are backed up a number of times in case a disaster where to happen or a breach in the system were to occur.

The incidence of medical errors have been distinctly decreased by using electronic means of keeping records. As we all know, human error happens all of the time but electronics don’t make mistakes. Electronic methods of record keeping are far more convenient and provide a high level of accuracy when it comes to storing patient data.

Medical records are important because they let the medical team know what occurred with you during your last appointment, surgery, or checkup. These records contain vital information about your health and well being. Imagine if your child was allergic to a medication and this info was noted in his or her records. You can be sure that the pharmacy and prescribing doctor would not issue this drug.

Medical records can save people’s lives and provide the medical staff with a clear history of your health. Electronic book keeping of these records ensures that your information is easy to access, kept safe, and let your doctor know everything he needs to know about your health history.

In this day and age, records can be shared (with your permission) electronically from one health professional to another. This can mean sending your electronic records within the same healthcare system or sending them to another country all from the push of a button.

In other words, electronic medical record systems have completely revamped how the medical system keeps patient records on file. These types are records can also be used in the legal system to either prove or disprove claims within the medical realm. Error free charting is important in this instance and electronic medical records can provide just that.

Skywriter MD is an innovative electronic medical record keeping company that was created to help medical providers regain time lost due to extensive charting and documenting of patient records. The company has honed and shaped a renowned software that collaborates with the medical facility staff and offers real-time communication with virtual scribes.

Dimensions Of Family Medicine

Modernization in the present day world finds its way in every bit of the human life. The advent of new gadgets and the change in the way human beings generally conduct their activities generally sets the trend for modernization to occur. In the practice of medicine, there have been several major discoveries that have come up, and alongside with the changes in the way medical practitioners carry out their activities. Family medicine is one of the arising areas of concern.

Family Medicine abbreviated as FM refers to the specialization in the intensive or comprehensive care of patients of all ranges. Family doctors and family physicians are involved in the practice of family medicine, and they differ from the regular doctors in the intensity of care with which they handle their patients. In Europe, Family medicine is known by the name General Practice and the person in charge of the patients for treatment of acute or chronic ailments is General Practice Doctor, abbreviated as GP.

Family medicine is a three-dimensional specialty that encompasses knowledge, skills and process. The process bit focuses on a physician-patient relationship for which the patient in question receives integrated care. With other physicians, specialty is limited to a specific disease, genders or organs, but with family physicians, the care extends to all genders and covers for all ailments.

Family medicine can be ideally traced to the care of patients after World WarII, with the intent of creating a dynamic shift from the practice of general medicine to provision of personal and quality medical care to people of all walks. With time, the attempt which started way back in 1969 has borne fruits in the fact that family physicians are now responsible for the provision of health care services to rural and urban inhabitants.

Family physicians receive extensive training in a bid to ensure that they are up to the task, which is providing the comprehensive care for patients with their differing ages. The residency program put in place after the graduation of family physicians from medical school presents them with an opportunity to acquire skills in the treatment of diseases in the following six major medical areas: community medicine, surgery, internal medicine, psychiatry and neurology, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynaecology. Family physicians, upon the acquisition of the skills, are in a position to also provide coordinated care with specialists handling specific diseases in their patients.

With family medicine, family physicians, in addition to diagnosing and treating diseases, provide preventive care. Preventive care is a wide scope in itself and covers for regular checkups, inoculation, screening tests, health-risk assessments and provision of advice on the maintenance of a quality and healthy lifestyle.

Primary care is the wider of medical care that family medicine falls under. The Institute of Medicine defines primary care as “the provision of integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for the addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients and practicing in the context of family and community”. Other primary care specialties include pediatrics and general internal medicine. Family physicians and doctors thus fall under a wider category of primary care physicians called family care physicians. While there are several similarities between family physicians and other primary care physicians, family physicians are at edge of making an overall impact on the health of a patient for their lifetime.The intent of primary care as is with family medicine is provision of patient-centered care as opposed to physician-centered care, an act that has helped in the achievement of impressive health outcomes, translating to saving costs associated with treating chronic illnesses which could have been handled in their acute stages.

Primary care is based on continuity as a key characteristic. The terms arise from fact that patients have their preference inclined to the consultation of the same primary care physician for the routine check-ups, health education and preventive care.